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Marie F. Treece

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Marie F. Treece of Mill Creek died Saturday, August 27, 2011 in Redmond, Wash. She was 90 years old.

Marie was born on March 19, 1921, in Spokane, Wash., to Thomas Bee Rowland and Mary (Cousin) Rowland. She was raised in the area and attended Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane, Wash.

She moved to Seattle in 1937 and attended the University of Washington where she earned her bachelor of arts degree.

She married Glen E. Treece in Seattle and stayed home to raise their three children, before returning to her professional career as a rate analyst for Safeco Insurance.

Marie is remembered as a loving and devoted wife and mother. She enjoyed reading, gardening, cooking, being her son’s Cub Scout den mother and playing cards with her friends.

She is survived by her husband, Glen E. Treece of Mill Creek; their three children, son Dennis C. Treece of Auburn, Wash., daughter, Glenna Wing of Bothell, Wash. and Tim Treece of Seattle. She will also be missed by nine grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.

Marie was preceded in death by her brother, Cecil Rowland.

By her request, a private family gathering will be held. In lieu of flowers, friends are encouraged to donate in Marie’s memory to a charity of their choice.

Friends are invited to share memories, view photos and sign the family’s on-line guest book at www.flintofts.com.

Arrangements by Flintofts Funeral Home and Crematory.

Norma Hall

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Obit HallNorma Macmillan Hall, 96, of Kirkland, Wash., passed away on August 10, 2011. She is survived by two daughters-in-law, Donna Senko of Capitola, Calif., and Tinka Hall of Bainbridge Island, Wash., grandchildren Trey Hall, Kristy Senko-Hall, Jeannie Senko-Hall, and Robbie Hall, as well as two great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her husband, J. Weston Hall, and her partner in her later years, Fred Fisher, her children Weston, Robert, and Nancy Jane and her siblings Del and Mary. Norma was born in 1915 in Sherman, Texas. She graduated from Denton College for Women and for many years taught elementary school in Texas. In 1981 she and her husband J. Weston moved from Texas to Santa Cruz, California. During her California years she was actively involved in local churches and soup kitchens for the homeless. Following J. Weston’s death in 1996, she moved to Woodinville, Washington, where she met Fred Fisher, who became her companion until his death in 2008.

Norma will be remembered for her ferocious energy and her southern drawl. She was outspoken and always the life of the party. She loved cooking and entertaining, RV traveling and boating, sewing and collecting dolls.

No public services are planned. Memorial contributions may be made to your favorite charity.

Lee Green

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Lee Green, as she was known to friends, passed away on July 28, 2011, in Kirkland.

Raised in Seattle, Lee’s childhood had many health challenges brought on by polio.

Only after several surgeries and months spent at Seattle’s Children’s Hospital was she able to claim the title polio survivor. Lee graduated from Seattle’s Garfield High School and soon after set out alone to travel the country, living in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New Orleans.

Working as a cashier in several theaters after World War II, she finally settled back in Seattle where she met Lloyd Elton Green Jr. of Tacoma. Eventually they married and lived a short time in Woodinville where they saw the arrival of their first son, James Winfield Green , now of La Jolla, Calif.

Later they moved to the Duvall area and saw the arrival of their daughter, Lorna Leigh (Green) Johnston of Everett and eventually their younger son, Tracy Alan Green of Bothell.

Having always lived in large cities, she was unaccustomed to rural life and found getting involved in civic organizations to be very important.

She joined the Duvall Civic Club in 1970 and was that club’s president several times. She was also a member of the Duvall Historical Society.

Always committed to educational opportunity Lee became concerned with the management of the public schools in the Lower Snoqualmie Valley.

This led to her running for school board and serving two terms on the board of district #407 and several years as board chairman.

She advocated the hiring of substitute teachers in the wake of a teachers’ strike so that the school year could begin on time while the labor dispute dragged on. Though this was a bold move against the union, she was always a strong advocate for teachers who struggled to do their job within a broken educational system.

In her later years, she continued to work within several civic organizations, as well as volunteering at the Sno-Valley Senior Center in Carnation where she worked with the Meals on Wheels program providing meals to homebound senior adults. She also spent several years as the senior center’s receptionist.

Lee is survived by her three children; her sisters, Dorothy Lopata and Louise Haverfield; four grandchildren, Stephanie McCamey, Tamara Johnston, Rory Green and Tiernan Green; two great-grandchildren, Kaeli and Makena McCamey.

A celebration of Lee’s life is being held on Saturday, August 20, at 11a.m. at First Baptist Church of Monroe, 17922 149th St. SE, Monroe (360-794-8044).

Mozelle Nalan

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Obit MozelleLeap Year Day 1992, in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, Ken and Natasha Nalan (Natalie Clark) were blessed with an adorable baby girl, Mozelle. Mozelle became extremely ill and doctors did not expect her to survive an emergency surgery at 36 hours old. God blessed Mozelle’s family and they enjoyed her bright blue eyes and shining spirit for 19 years, 4 months and 17 days. We are striving to thank God for the precious years we had her instead of those we lost.

Mozelle spent her childhood years in Skagway, Alaska. Many happy times were spent with her dog, Shelley. During summer she would hike to and camp at Upper Lake with Judy Selmer and even hiked the Chilkoot Trail. She had planned to hike the Pacific Crest Trail as an adult.

Mozelle got her musical ability from her grandpa, Glen Clark who taught strings in the Northshore elementary schools and orchestra at Canyon Park Jr. High for over 20 years.

She could write and sing wonderful songs. She loved skiing, swimming, rock climbing, zip lines but most of all playing with her siblings. She attended horse camp at Heart-Bar Ranch, first as a camper then as a counselor.

Her Baha’I faith was important to her.

Mozelle was honored to attend NCCI in London, Ontario, and enjoyed her teachers and friends. She happily immersed herself in dance, music and theater.

Mozelle then moved with her mother and siblings to the Bothell/Woodinville area to be closer to the medical care she needed.

During her treatments she would take time to visit teenage cancer patients during their chemo.

Her love of horses led her to volunteer at Little Bit Therapeutic riding stable. This allowed her to meld her love of horses, children and service to others. She had hoped to make this her career.

Sadly that desire to serve others was cut short when she was murdered while volunteering in Anchorage.

Please honor Mozelle’s life of service by doing a good deed on Leap Year Day and sign up on her facebook page: Mozelle Nalan Memorial Leap Into Service.

A memorial celebration of life has been held.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to your favorite charity or Little Bit Therapeutic Riding Center as Mozelle spent many happy hours volunteering there and had planned to make that her career. Their address is 19802 N.E. 148th Street, Woodinville, WA 98077, phone (425) 882-1554or littlebit.org.

Mozelle may have only lived 19 years, but she touched many lives.

She is survived by her parents Ken and Natasha Nalan (Natalie Clark); beloved siblings, Erik, Aurora and Layli; grandparents, Glen and Mozelle Clark; aunt, Sharna Clark (Donovan) and her family and extended family.

Rex B. Peters

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Red Peters, 76, of Woodinville, passed away at his home July 2 surrounded by his family. He was a leading engineer in his field and was awarded 32 patents in the areas of inertial studies, and precision aerospace sensors. Several of his patents were for top secret programs, many of which are still classified.

His work helped improve the performance of certain military and reconnaissance satellites and has been integral in the continued development of today’s commercial aircraft navigation.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the American Alzheimer’s Association or the American Cancer Society. Funeral plans are being made by the Neptune Society with internment at the Veteran’s Cemetery.