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Rain Garden Training for Landscape Professionals

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Nov. 12 & 14
Van Haley House, Everett
For event details and to register go to: raingardentraining.eventbrite.com

Landscape designers, installers and maintenance technicians are invited to take advantage of a one and half day training on Nov. 12 & 14 in Everett. The training will focus on rain gardens and other low impact development practices gaining in popularity with savvy homeowners who want to control run-off and beautify their yards. The class will cover site selection, soils, local regulations, designs, plant selection and more.

The demand for properly installed rain gardens is growing, creating a role and tremendous opportunity for landscape designers, installers and maintenance technicians. State and local programs regulating municipal stormwater discharges are constantly changing and landscape professionals must be able to understand and support regulations aimed at controlling stormwater runoff. These regulations are and will increasingly result in the creation of new jobs in the landscape industry.The cost for the training is $100 for those who register after Oct. 31. Included in registration will be lunch and refreshments, handbook and information on local regulations. To register, sign up online at raingardentraining.eventbrite.com or contact Kate Riley at 425-377-7004.

Learn beekeeping this winter; enjoy the sweet life next summer

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

From the skyscrapers of New York City to backyards in Western Washington, there’s a movement afoot to raise honeybees not only for the sweet delights they create but their positive effect on our local food crops.
A majority of the foods we eat depend on honeybees for pollination. Without them Washington’s fruit and vegetable industries would not exist nor would backyard gardeners be able to harvest an abundance each year.

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Farming on 300 square feet

  • Written by by Ariana de Leña Manager, First Light Farm

What do farming and a New York City apartment have in common? Both can be done in a mere 300 square feet! At First Light Farm in Carnation, this year 22 families took on their own “Mini Farm,” a 300-square-foot patch of land upon which they grew their own organic vegetables. Much like a community garden, the Mini Farm program allows gardeners to participate in a collective growing experience; Mini Farmers share tips for trellising rogue peas and sunflowers or lend one another extra starts over evening run-ins at the farm or at frequent farm potlucks.

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FROSTY FOCAL POINTS: Winter container gardening

  • Written by Molbaks garden+home

As the leaves are falling and the heady days of autumn come to a close, do you find yourself staring at unsightly outdoor planters on your doorstep?  This winter, why not use your containers a full four seasons and add excitement to your entry with some easy-care color!

When planting winter containers, you’ll need to prep them a little differently than your summer containers.  Rain and fluctuating temperatures, freezing and thawing can stress some plants and your pots, but if you choose wisely, you’ll be rewarded with winter-long beauty.   

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Gracious garden screening

  • Written by Molbaks garden+home

When someone says, “screening plants” what comes to mind? Tall, fast-growing hedges, planted to block the view of your neighbor’s garbage cans? Thickets of prickly barberry bushes, preventing man and beast from running across your lawn?

Screening plants aren’t just for privacy or windbreaks; well-placed screening plants can also frame or enhance a view. Some create a veil of greenery during certain times of the year. Others, with correct positioning, can discourage traffic and encourage it along a different path. And still more can create garden rooms with living, semi-transparent walls, offering a tranquil retreat.

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