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Northshore School District prepares to shift school service areas

  • Written by Briana Gerdeman

Now is the time to get a first glimpse at what schools your kids might be attending in 2017 — and whether you’re happy with it or not, to voice your opinion.

The Northshore School District has three big changes coming up in the 2017-2018 school year: the opening of North Creek High School, grade reconfiguration from a junior high to a middle school model and boundary adjustments for almost all schools in the district. The boundary changes are necessary because of grade reconfiguration and growth in the north end of the school district, and to create a service area and a feeder pattern of elementary and middle schools for North Creek High School.

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Bothell struck twice by racist vandalism last week

  • Written by Briana Gerdeman

On the morning of Feb. 15, two similar incidents of vandalism were reported in Bothell. The outside wall of the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center had been graffitied with a swastika and the words “GET OUT.” At Skyview Junior High School, graffiti was discovered on the exterior of buildings showing a swastika and reading “Muslims get out” and “Muslims be gone.”

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Alzheimer’s Association offers Caregiver Support Group

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Caring for someone with memory loss? Do you need information and support? Alzheimer’s Association family caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with memory loss. Meetings are held the third Monday of the month, from 7-9 p.m., at St Andrew’s Lutheran Church, Room 1E2, 2650 148th Ave SE, Bellevue, WA 98007. For information call Bill Lukov at 206-367-4895.

For more information on the Alzheimer’s Association, visit www.alzwa.org.

Woodinville Village waiting on City Council to extend development agreement

  • Written by Briana Gerdeman

Plans are under way to make a vibrant district out of Woodinville Village, the stalled mixed-use development in the Hollywood District. But even as the developer presented an update to the Chamber of Commerce last week, Woodinville Village’s fate rests on two decisions the Woodinville City Council will have to make.

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Neat not required: bill would allow distilleries to serve mixers in their tasting rooms

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

OLYMPIA – It should be a sin to drink gin straight up. At the very least, it shouldn’t be the only way to legally sample it. But right now, Washington distilleries have to serve it that way. The same goes for vodka, bourbon, whiskey and any other spirit distilled in Washington.

On Feb. 10, the House Commerce and Gaming Committee held a public hearing on House Bill 1903, a bill by Rep. Strom Peterson (D – Edmonds) that would allow Washington distilleries to serve mixers in their tasting rooms. Under current law, they are only legally allowed to serve samples of their product straight up, cut with water or on the rocks. Peterson’s legislation would add soda, tonic, ginger ale and other common mixers to that list.

“Washington has become the hot place to open up a specialty distillery,” Peterson said. “Sales of locally-distilled spirits boost the economy and provide important revenue for the state. In order to support this growing industry, we should allow them to showcase their products in the way they are intended to be enjoyed.”

Supporting Washington distilleries also supports Washington farmers, who produce the wheat, corn, potatoes, fruit and other agricultural products that are used to distill spirits and liqueurs. For instance, craft distillers who are exempt from distiller’s licensing fees are required to use Washington-grown products for at least half of their materials.

HB 1903 would not change the amount of liquor served in distillery tasting rooms – it would still be limited to two fluid ounces per guest. But Peterson believes this new law would encourage safer consumption of distillery samples.

“This will allow a more relaxed atmosphere where guests can sip their samples instead of having to drink them like shots,” Peterson said.