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Backpacks for Kids

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

BOTHELL— Northshore School District’s 12th annual Backpacks for Kids school supply donation campaign will run July 15 through August 5. The school district, Woodinville Chamber and the Northshore Kiwanis are coordinating a community-wide drive to benefit 750 Northshore students whose families are unable to send their children to school with necessary school supplies.

Local businesses and churches have volunteered to be collection sites during the donation drive.

Northshore is currently looking for volunteers to help assemble backpacks on August 11. Student community service hours are available upon request.

Monetary donations (payable to Backpacks for Kids) can be sent to the Northshore School District Administrative Center, 3330 Monte Villa Parkway, Bothell, WA 98021.

Northshore School District families in need of this resource should contact their school nurse.

Go to www.nsd.org/backpacks for a complete list of requested school supplies and donation collection sites.

Contact Cecilia Shumate at (425) 408.7670 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you’d like to help assemble backpacks on August 11 or for program information.

NE 175th Street overlay begins

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

The westbound lane of Northeast 175th Street from 140th Avenue Northeast to 131st Avenue Northeast will be under construction from July 18 to July 26; all work will be conducted at night, Monday through Friday between 8 p.m. and 5 a.m. Construction is not scheduled to occur during the daytime hours, or over the weekend.

Earlier this year, XO Communications installed a new electrical conduit along NE 175th Street, in downtown Woodinville, in order to provide access for prospective customers to their telecommunications network. As a condition of their permit with the City of Woodinville, XO Communications is required to grind and repave the westbound lane of NE 175th Street, from 140th Avenue NE to 131st Avenue NE, to repair sections of asphalt that were disturbed during their construction project.

The grind and paving operation was scheduled to begin July 18. The roadway work is expected to be completed by July 26, although work is weather dependent so delays may occur. Every effort will be made to minimize the impact to traffic during operations, and to adjacent business owners’ driveway entrances; however, please expect traffic delays during project hours for up to 20 minutes along NE 175th Street.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the this project you may contact Gary Rollofson, with G & L Utility Contractors Inc. at (206) 255-2695 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Backpacks for Kids kicks off

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Drop off at Woodinville Weekly

Northshore School District’s 12th annual Backpacks for Kids school supply donation campaign will run through August 5. The school district, Woodinville Chamber and the Northshore Kiwanis are coordinating a community-wide drive to benefit 750 Northshore students whose families are unable to send their children to school with necessary school supplies.

Local businesses and churches, including the Woodinville Weekly (13400 N.E. 175th St., Ste. C.), have volunteered to be collection sites during the donation drive. Northshore is currently looking for volunteers to help assemble backpacks on August 11. Student community service hours are available upon request. Monetary donations (payable to Backpacks for Kids) can be sent to the Northshore School District Administrative Center, 3330 Monte Villa Parkway, Bothell, WA 98021.

Northshore School District families in need of this resource should contact their school nurse. Go to www.nsd.org/backpacks for a complete list of requested school supplies and donation collection sites.

Council tackles construction, art, field rentals and technology

  • Written by Don Mann
With Mayor Chuck Price absent for the third consecutive week, six of seven Woodinville City Council members were on hand Tuesday to discuss five study session items Tuesday at its regularly scheduled meeting.

Four votes were taken, no-brainers all, and each passed unanimously.

First off, the council awarded a construction contract to Sanders General Construction of Maple Valley for the Woodinville-Snohomish Road/NE 195th Street widening project for $1,015,000, an increase of over $300,000 in the original estimate.

Woodinville City Works Director Tom Hansen said bids came in higher than expected, noting the higher cost of construction work done at night, asphalt costs more than anticipated due to global oil hikes and the price of traffic control at the troublesome intersection. City Finance Director Jim Katicka said the city’s uncommitted REET 1 and REET 2 funds from 2010 would offset the increase and would not jeopardize other future capital projects. The council then approved a bid from Road Construction Northwest of Renton of $330,000 for the construction of a strip of sidewalk on NE 145th St., west of the Chateau Ste. Michelle boundary from 138th Street to SR-202. The bid was $80,000 more than anticipated for similar reasons, but will be covered under the same REET resources, Hansen said.

The next item of business got a little touchy, and Oregon artist Shelley Curtis took a thumping she will never know, and it was complicated.

Malka Fricks, who passed away in January at age 73, was a longtime Woodinville resident, an arts lover and an original member of the city’s erstwhile Public Arts Advisory Committee as well as the current Park and Recreation Commission. Marla, a New York transplant, told it like it was and was known for her sense of humor.

In her will Fricks dedicated $20,000 for a public arts sculpture to be established at the city center corner of NE 175th Street and 133rd Avenue NE. The executor of her estate suggested various pieces of sculpture from Curtis and provided photos: cougar, hare, fox, doe, wolf and basset hounds. The council was asked to express its preference for a selection, and found none of them representative.

"I’m disappointed we’re not giving this due time and due diligence to honor her appropriately," Councilmember Liz Aspen said. "This is an emotional issue for those of us who cared about Malka. For her to donate $20,000 is a big deal."

She said the council needed to find a quality piece of art that reflects Woodinville and Malka’s whimsical nature.

After much discussion it was moved to request Fricks’ executor for permission to eschew the provided samples and choose a piece of more representative art by forming a citizen committee of friends and associates of Malka.

The next agenda item was of a housekeeping nature: Approval of Resolution No. 407, amending parks’ facility rental policies, procedures and rates.

With Woodinville Fields the only city rental available, there was an emphasis on lower rates for citizens of Woodinville.

Though having effectively priced itself out of the market by dint of a previous vote which set higher rental rates, the council determined that to qualify for the current resident discount it’s now mandatory that the user have at least 50 members or 10 percent of the organization be city residents, and youth groups have priority over adult groups in terms of rental block time.

Finally, council held a discussion on electronic attendance by council members. At a previous meeting council directed city staff to research the matter and staff discovered a number of regional cities that allowed electronic attendance under limited conditions.

Alexandra Sheeks, assistant to the city manager, pointed out the pros and cons regarding the issue.

Pros were limited, but included dealing with a situation where a quorum (a majority, in this case four of seven members) was available in case of emergency when policy needed to be determined.

Cons included the need for necessary and perhaps costly, effectual electronic equipment, a determination of when it would be appropriate, and — pointedly — a risk to public interaction and transparency.

Councilmember Paulette Bauman was quick to express her non-support.

"It goes against transparency ... and it’s just not good government," she said.

Councilmember Jeff Glickman wanted to re-define "when appropriate."

Councilmember Liz Aspen said there had never been a case in city history when a quorum was not in attendance and did not support it other than in a city emergency.

Councilmember Scott Hageman also expressed non-support, other than in a "true" emergency situation. "It should not be a regular practice by any means," he said.

Councilmember Susan Boundy-Sanders suggested that telephonic appearances might be put in place if called for.

There was some question on whether the issue was for the benefit of a personal or public emergency and Glickman reminded the council that the issue was for the benefit of the city, not the council member.

Deputy Mayor Bernie Talmas was firm in opposition other than in a true emergency, and directed city staff to draft future language policy in accordance with the prevailing opinions, should the need arise.

Fall CERT class begins Sept. 12 at Duvall Fire Station

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

In the wake of a disaster, professional emergency responders may not be immediately available.

The Carnation Duvall Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) seeks to fill the gap with a citizens’ training program designed to lessen the impact on family and neighbors until assistance arrives.

Community Emergency Response Teams are neighbors helping neighbors. The Carnation-Duvall Citizen Corps once again will offer its fall CERT class in an effort to increase the community’s CERT volunteer base — better preparing ourselves, our families and our neighbors for the inevitable — the next flood, ice storm, wind storm, power outage or other form of community disaster.

The CERT skills taught by Carnation-Duvall Citizen Corps include how to organize for a disaster, how to assess a damaged structure before going in, how to put out a small fire before it gets big, how to perform a light search and rescue, how to triage and remove any victims found, how to give first aid to those with life-threatening injuries and how to cope with the stress of a disaster — and how to do it all safely.

Throughout the class, students share experiences, ideas and multiple Q&A opportunities with past CERT grads and Carnation-Duvall Citizen Corps Council leaders – other contributors to the local emergency preparedness arena.

The next CERT training session will start Monday, September 12, at the Duvall Fire Station and continue for the seven subsequent Monday evenings (skipping October 31 for Halloween). This CERT class will run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. and end on November 7 with the group’s "graduation exercise" which takes place in the fire truck bays, loading dock and training room of the Carnation Fire Station.

This final exercise is an opportunity for each student, working with past CERT grads and Citizen Corps leaders, to put all their new skills and knowledge to test in a mock disaster drill.

A donation of $35 is asked for the 20 hours of training. Registration information can be obtained at www.carnationduvallcitizencorps.org. Training is open to residents and local employees 18 years of age and up; those 16-17 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Go to the Carnation-Duvall Citizen Corps website for a registration form or call Helen Duffy at (425) 457-6322. You may also email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you are interested in becoming a CERT volunteer.