The Edwards Agency

Opinion

Northshore's Outcome Based Education performs at very high level

Outcome Based Education Writers of recent letters to the editor have questioned the quality of education in the Northshore School District. Individuals who watch the year-to-year statistics of the accomplishments of the graduates from Northshore know there is no basis for their charges.
   Year after year, there are National Merit Scholarship winners, individual scholarships, admission to prestigious universities, colleges, and military academies, and a very respectable number entering various community colleges and technical institutions, attesting to graduates being ready to continue their academic goals. That is Outcome Education Performance at a very high level.
   Educators love initials and new titles when presenting educational philosophy. Never mind that it may be a recycling of similar ideas or practices. Many generations of children have been the product of schools where the teachers presented new materials, spent time reinforcing, expanding, and then testing. If test results were good, the OBP was good.
   That may be a bit simplistic, but certainly is essentially true. However, the good teachers had a good basis for improving their success. This very process has led to the teaching of reading by incorporating all the tools and methodology to help children (each in his or her own way) to master the skill of reading.
   Perhaps the greatest obstacle facing the present generation of kids is the societal changes that has made the world an audiovisual one: Television and radio have lessened their desire to master the written word.
   Books do not have the enchantment of Nintendo or VCRs. It will take much more than the teacher in the classroom to revive the love of books and reading.
   Parents must not worry so much about the mechanics of reading and spend more time making reading a shared time of enjoyment. Otherwise, even the best of readers will continue to turn to TV, the VCR, or the computer games, rather than to books.

Ina Knutsen, Bothell