The Edwards Agency

Features

The Woodinville community: A collection of vibrant neighborhoods

Woodinville community by Wendy Walsh, Community Neighborhoods Editor
Woodinville is a complex community which has several divisions. It includes both incorporated and unincorporated areas, and is situated in both the Sammamish Valley and Bear Creek Valley.
   The incorporated section is centered in the middle of the Sammamish Valley. The unincorporated part is mainly in the Bear Creek Valley, which starts at the Summit, just west of Lake Leota and south of Wellington Hills.
   Greater Woodinville extends east almost to the Snoqualmie Valley. To the north, it runs past the Snohomish County line to include Crystal Lake, parts of Reintree, and the wonderfully eccentric township of Grace. To the south, the line varies a bit with topography, but generally includes Hollywood Hill, all of Ring Hill, and the area around Mink Road and Bear Creek Road.
   Within this area are many neighborhoods, which are often unknown to the rest of Woodinville folks. A surprising number of people have never heard of Tuck Lake, but this area has many new homes which have been built in the last 15 years. It is as much a part of the Woodinville community as Wellington Hills, which has been here for 30 years.
   In order to acquaint us all with our extended community, the Woodinville Weekly is beginning a series of articles on the area's many neighborhoods. The first is an overview of the Eastern part of Woodinville.
   The Bear Creek Valley is a watershed which begins in the northwest in the Crystal Lake wetlands area. Bostain Road is the closest boundary between the Sammamish Valley and Bear Creek watersheds. To the east of Bostain, there are numerous wetlands and small ponds which feed into Crystal Lake.
   In the early 1900s, a group of Seattle-area men formed a hunting club at Crystal Lake. The members built a large, two-story lodge out of logs. Later, small cabins were added as weekend retreats, and the club prospered.
   Eventually, the original club dissolved, and Crystal Lake became incorporated as a private residential community. The small cabins were remodeled or replaced by modern homes. The Crystal Lake Lodge became a historical landmark and was used in several films, including The Black Widow (1986). It was also rented out for weddings and receptions. The old lodge was destroyed by fire in 1986, and the club has since built a new log clubhouse.
   The community has placed the surrounding land into a conservancy and has protected the ecosystem which feeds into Crystal Lake. The creek which leaves the lake is now called Daniels Creek, but there is some controversy about this.
   Nancy Stafford, a member of Water Tenders, discovered that some of the creeks may have lost their original identities. She notes that old-timers say Daniels Creek is really the creek which runs through the Cottage Lake Shopping center, and what is now Daniels Creek should be called Crystal Creek.
   Both of these creeks feed into Cottage Lake, along with the drainage from Lake Leota. Waterways attract homesites, which then become neighborhoods.
   In the weeks to come, there will be articles about these neighborhoods in Bear Creek Valley, and the people who live there.