Northwest NEWS

August 24, 1998

Local News

PSRC needs comment on road projects

   by Woodinville Weekly staff
  
   WOODINVILLE--Improving State Route 522 and timing downtown Woodinville traffic signals are on amended Transportation Improvement Program before a regional planning body.
  
   They are just two of 57 projects stretching from Arlington south to Tacoma that the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) is asking for public comment on.
  
   Together, the projects have a combined price tag of $425 million.
  
   Their goal is to increase traffic safety and address congestion in the central Puget Sound basin.
  
   "What's significant," said King Cushman, regional council transportation planning director, "is that gradually it appears many of the projects that have been on the shelf are now moving forward."
  
   The city of Woodinville has four projects listed:
   All those projects made the city's recently adopted Capital Improvement Plan.
  
   In south Snohomish County, about $526,000 would go towards improving SR 522 between Paradise Lake Road and the Snohomish River.
  
   A copy of the proposed program is available for review by calling the PSRC at (206) 464-7532. It is also available on the Internet at www.psrc.org.
  
   Projects were forwarded to the council by PSRC members which include the state, King, Snohomish, Pierce and Kitsap counties, as well as 64 cities like Woodinville and Bothell.
   The Transportation Improvement Program includes all projects that would use federal or state dollars. To proceed they must be listed on the TIP.
  
   To be included, projects also must help meet federal and state air quality standards and be consistent with regional growth management and transportation strategies.
  
   A formal comment period continues through Sept. 10. Written comments should be sent to Karen Richter, Puget Sound Regional Council, 1011 Western Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle 98104.
  
   After comment, the proposal will be forwarded to the PSRC Executive Board Sept. 24th, and with approval, will proceed to Gov. Gary Locke and the federal government for final approval.