Northwest NEWS

December 14, 1998

Editorial

No compelling need for pipeline

Since fuel shortages do not threaten the Tri-Cities, why should we allow this pipeline to threaten our state parks, including Gingko Petrified Forest, the John Wayne Trail, and Cedar Falls Trail, and other public facilities?

   With no rising gasoline prices plaguing the Tri-Cities area, why should we place several threatened and sensitive species at risk? These species include the northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, and plants, including golden paintbrush, Wenatchee checkermallow, Piper's daisy, and others.

   Furthermore, the affected National Forests have yet to do numerous plant and wildlife surveys required within the range of the spotted owl; without these surveys, we cannot know if these plants and animals are at risk from the project. Naturally, the hundreds of waterway crossings place salmon, steelhead, and bull trout at risk.

   The DEIS reveals that a slow leak of 25,200 gallons a day may not be detected until someone spots a pool of petroleum products above ground. That is not acceptable.

   The pipeline also poses a risk to Puget Sound. Increased production at Puget Sound refineries means more tanker traffic and a greater risk of massive, catastrophic oil spills. The DEIS fails to disclose any of these impacts.

   For more information, check out the website www.pipelineleaks.com, or call 206-728-1289.

Eric Espenhorst & Mike Sato, Seattle