Northwest NEWS

January 17, 2000

Front Page

North Creek pump station, public artwork dedicated

Influence of Influents: Rain Drain

Norie Sato's Influence of Influents: Rain Drain is an A-shaped sculpture, built into the side of the facility's north face. It drains rainwater from the flat roof, running down the sculpture's varied-texture surface.

by Marshall Haley, staff reporter

   BOTHELL--The North Creek Pump Station, a wastewater pumping station that will eventually include a six-million-gallon storage capacity, was dedicated by King County Executive Ron Sims, County Council Chair Louise Miller, and several Northshore mayors on Tuesday, Jan. 11. Sims also dedicated Seattle artist Norie Sato's large copper sculpture, entitled Rain Drain, part of King County's public art program.

   Sato's A-shaped sculpture, built into the side of the facility's north face, drains rainwater from the flat roof, running down the sculpture's varied-texture surface to create a symbolic connection between nature and man-made structures. The public might find the artwork alone worth a visit to the stylish, red rock and brick-sided building located at 18707 North Creek Parkway, on the curve northwest of Home Depot in the Quadrant business park.

   The facility, in operation since November, is the first step toward preventing sewage backups and overflows in the Northshore area. Phase II of the project will include installing the storage tanks, which was part of a compromise reached between Sims and the Council's majority, which until November had favored another pipeline to the West Point Treatment Plant at Magnolia. The North Creek storage tanks are designed as a stop-gap solution until the region's third treatment plant--which will process 36 million gallons a day--is finished in north King County by 2010.

   During heavy rains, the North Creek station will intercept overflow from Bothell, Woodinville, and North Creek. It will pump wastewater through two five-mile pipes to the York Pump Station at NE 124th and Willows Rd., which in turn pumps water to the South Treatment Plant in Renton, which has capacity to hold winter storm overflows.

   Construction on the storage tanks will begin early in 2001 and finish by late 2002. Miller said when County staff located the property, they only needed one acre for the pump station. With an eye toward providing more sorely-needed athletic field space, Miller recommended the County buy the whole six-acre parcel. That move proved visionary, after Miller led the Council to a wastewater strategy compromise with Sims.

   When the tanks are finished, soccer fields will be built on top of that area. Northshore Youth Soccer boosters, including Jorge Barrera and Geoff Clayton, were on hand to thank Miller and Sims for providing more fields for children. Until tank construction begins, the location will be used for practice fields, said Clayton.