Northwest NEWS

December 17, 2001

Features

City Council honors Woodinville citizens, businesses

by Bronwyn Wilson
   Senior Staff Reporter
   In 1976, Woodinville didn't have a community newspaper and so resident Carol Edwards decided to start one. As the mother of six children, she wanted to know about local children's activities as well as community news events. She was certain others were interested in the information too. Copies of her new newspaper, The Woodinville Weekly, were soon rolling off the tabletop printing press in her garage. The first issue premiered with 5,000 copies. With the help of a few friends, Edwards delivered the new paper to businesses around town. Today, she operates out of an office building downtown and has 25 employees. She not only publishes The Woodinville Weekly, but also Valley View and Northlake News. The combined newspapers have a circulation of 32,000.
   On Dec. 10th, the City Council set time aside at their meeting to give Edwards special recognition for her 25 years of service in providing news to the community. As she was honored, Council members‹as well as the city manager and city clerk‹wore construction hats with paper basset hound ears dangling at the hat's side. This was done as a gesture of support. Edwards has not only provided the community with news, but also helped initiate the city's annual Basset Bash, a favorite Woodinville event for 19 years, which has become the city's signature as well as an important component to the "Celebrate Woodinville" festivities each spring.
   With basset ears on, Mayor Randy Ransom presented Edwards with the key to the city and a certificate of recognition.
   Other Woodinville businesses were also acknowledged at the Council meeting. A certificate of recognition was given for local businesses that supported the Habitat for Humanity "Building Blitz" undertaken in September and October. Those honored included: John DeVore of Champion Metal; Lynn Lynch of Lloyd Lynch Contracting; Dan Meyer of Northshore Sheet Metal and Wayne Brigden of Woodinville Lumber who accepted the certificate at the meeting. Mia Walterson from Habitat for Humanity was also in attendance.
   Mayor Randy Ransom was the final person to receive honors of gratitude that evening. Having served as Woodinville's mayor since January 2000 and having been elected to the council in 1997, Ransom's term ends at the close of 2001. Deputy Mayor Scott Hageman presented Mayor Ransom with a gavel engraved with his name and the dates of his service as city mayor.
   Communications Coordinator Marie Stake sums up the Council's recognition of citizens who have made a positive impact on the community, "The Council realizes the importance of recognizing citizens and businesses that give their time, money and skill for the good of the community."