Northwest NEWS

September 30, 2002

Home & Garden

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Dining In: Enjoying the Harvest's Bounty

The harvest season, traditionally lasting from late summer through fall, offers a perfect combination of weather elements to produce the most colorful and succulent of mother earth's bounty. This year's harvest provides an opportunity to celebrate two culinary movements embraced by Americans nationwide—the reliance on fresh fruits and vegetables for a straight from-the-garden taste experience and the growing popularity of wine as the perfect companion to delicious, fresh foods.
   From rooftop gardens to farmers markets, consumers are growing their own vegetables, fruits and herbs to create mouthwatering dishes from scratch—or to enhance store-bought meals with a touch of freshness.
  
   Fettuccine Primavera
   3 Tbsp. olive oil
   3 c. chopped fresh assorted vegetables (broccoli florets, red bell pepper, onions, sliced mushrooms or cauliflower)
   1/2 tsp. salt
   1 jar (26 ounces) prepared Tomato & Basil Pasta Sauce, heated
   8 ounces fettuccine, cooked and drained
   Parmesan cheese, grated (optional)
   In 12-inch nonstick skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat and cook vegetables, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in salt. To serve, spoon hot pasta sauce over hot fettuccine, then top with vegetable mixture. Sprinkle, if desired, with grated Parmesan cheese.
   Note: One package (16 ounces) frozen assorted vegetables, thawed and drained, may be substituted for fresh.
   4 servings
  
   Skillet Chicken Saltimbocca
   4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 1-1/4 pounds)
   1 egg, slightly beaten
   1/4 c. all-purpose flour
   1/4 tsp. salt
   1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
   1 Tbsp. olive oil
   1 jar (26 ounces) prepared Marinara & Burgundy Wine Pasta Sauce
   4 thin slices prosciutto
   4 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced
   1/4 c. shredded fresh basil
   Dip chicken in egg, then flour combined with salt and pepper, until evenly coated.
   In 12-inch nonstick skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat and brown chicken, about 8 minutes, turning once. Remove chicken and set aside. In same skillet, add pasta sauce and cook 2 minutes.
   Meanwhile, evenly top chicken with prosciutto and mozzarella. Return chicken to skillet. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, 5 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked and cheese is melted. Serve, if desired, over hot cooked vermicelli and sprinkle with fresh basil.
   4 servings
  
   Tuscan Chicken Stew
   1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into chunks
   1/3 c. dry white wine or chicken broth
   1 jar (26 ounces) Olive Oil & Garlic Pasta Sauce
   1 Tbsp. small capers, rinsed and drained
   1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
   1 large fresh zucchini, halved lengthwise and sliced
   1 loaf French bread, diagonally cut into 1-inch slices and toasted
   In 12-inch nonstick skillet, brown chicken over medium-high heat about 3 minutes, turning once. Add wine and boil 30 seconds.
   Stir in pasta sauce, capers and pepper. Simmer covered 3 minutes. Add zucchini and cook, covered, 5 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Serve stew over bread.
   4 servings
  
   Penne Rustica
   1 Tbsp. olive oil
   1/3 c. fresh chopped onion
   1 clove fresh garlic, finely chopped
   1/4 c. chopped, drained sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
   1/4 c. dry white wine or chicken broth
   1 jar (16 ounces) Creamy Alfredo Pasta Sauce
   1/8 tsp. ground black pepper
   1 box (16 ounces) penne pasta, cooked and drained
   Parmesan cheese, shaved (optional)
   In 12-inch nonstick skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat and cook onion, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes or until tender. Stir in garlic and cook 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes and wine.
   Bring to boil over high heat. Stir in pasta sauce and pepper. Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes or until heated through.
   Toss with hot penne and garnish, if desired, with shaved Parmesan cheese.
   6 servings
   Recipes courtesy of Family Features.